Myofascial Decompression Cupping

1.7 FASCIA & CONNECTIVE TISSUE

You must first complete 1.6 INTRO TO STYLES OF CUPPING EQUIPMENT before viewing this Lesson

WHAT IS FASCIA?

 

“Fascia is the collagenous, fibrous connective tissues that are elements of a whole-body tensional force transmission network.”  Fascia Research Congress Definition

Signals to communicate actions to the body are transmitted through the fascial system. This communication to the cells tells your body how and when to move, change shape, and adapt to the current situation.

If you stay in one position for too long, these signals will nudge you to move.  

If you ignore them or are unable to move or change positions as in sitting at a desk working all day, then the body will form thicker fascial layers in the areas where the prolonged pressure, stress or strain is located.

These collagenous layers are laid down:

  • in a disorderly
  • unorganized fashion
  • they thicken
  • they crush
  • and  they restrict

Fascia has the ability to exhibit up to 2000 lbs of pressure and is cable of crushing nerves, vessels, arteries, muscles and organs.

FASCIA & REPETITIVE STRESS

  • Collagen Deposits – The body is designed to deposit collagen in areas with repetitive strain or stress.
  • Active & Inactive-  Deposits are made in both
  • Stretching is the Antidote- Stretching realigns the collagenous fibers that are thick and disorganized.
  • Cupping Adds 3rd Dimensional Stretching – Most stretches are only able to accomplish a 2 Dimensional Stretch whereas cupping adds the 3rd Dimension to the stretch to help increase space in the areas that have shortened and compacted.
  • Largest System in they Body
  • Framework of most structures in the Body
  • Influences all physiological functions of the body
  • Contains liquid vibrating crystals transmitting mechanical information including gene expression, hormone regulation, and transmit signals throughout the body for survival and daily function of cells.

Fastest and most efficient Whole Body communication and operating system separate of the brain and nervous system…. And FASTER!

THREE TIMES FASTER THAN THE NERVOUS SYSTEM!

 

UNTIL RECENT TIMES, FASCIA WAS KNOWN AS THE WHITE STUFF IN THE WAY WHEN

DISSECTING & IN SURGERY


CONNECTIVE TISSUE

  • Superficial Fascial Layer- (The Non dense, loose, Areolar layer)
  • Perimysium- (Connective Tissue wraps around muscle fascicles- muscle fibers)
  • Epimysium (Next Deeper Layer)- Connective Tissue sac surrounding each individual muscle fiber (Dense irregular connective Tissue)
  • Intermuscular fascia- Connective Tissue connects connective tissue of one muscular structure to another.
  • All other structures within the muscle are affected by the cupping: ie: Vascular, Neural, Contractile and other fascial elements.

Cupping can reach up to 4 inches through the tissue.

    1. Matrix – Includes Fibers (Collagen, Elastin & Ground Substance)

 

  • Collagen – approx 20 types of collagen

 

  • Thick Fibrils that resists Tensile Stress -Tendons, Ligaments,
  • Thin Fibrils that resists compressive loads -Cartilage, Nucleus pulposus of intervertebral disc
  • Fibrils & Reticular Fibrils that establish framework -Non Dense Connective Tissue
  • Loose Connective Tissue resists tensile loads but can shear & reform

b. Elastin – like collagen is a protein. It has more elastic properties than Collagen & more prevalent in tissues which must stretch and recoil to its original length.

  1. Ground Substance- Forms the bulk of the space in non-dense Connective Tissue and is filled with Hydrophilic (water binding gel like polymers) Glycosaminoglycans or Proteoglycans.
  • Proteoglycans water binding properties help the ground substance function as protective, shock absorbing role.
  • It helps to distribute stresses and maintains an environment to support cells and its other vital components.
  • Ground Substance creates the environment for the fibers to exist functionally in a 3D Matrix capable of compressive, tensile or shear forces
  • Allows nutrients and metabolites to move through tissues.
  • Allows vascular, lymph and neural structures to course through.
  1. Cells – Mainly Fibroblasts Cells
  2. These incredible cells are able to produce Collagen, Elastin and the Ground Substance

A fibroblast is a type of cell that synthesizes the extracellular matrix and collagen, the structural framework (stroma) for tissues, and plays a critical role in wound healing.

Two Main Types of Connective Tissue that interests us from a Myofascial Decompression Cupping Perspective.

  1. Dense (Irregular) Connective Tissue – Areolar (non dense located between skin & epimysium which has major impact on determining shape of body) Connective Tissue (Superficial fascia). Ligaments, Tendons, aponeuroses
  2. Deep Irregular Connective Tissue- Deep Fascia Tissue- Epimysium, Joint Capsule and Tendon Sheath

  • Sparsely non arranged fibers and contains both Collagen and Elastin.
  • White Blood Cells, Mast Cells (Immunity & Repair), Plasma Cells (Antibodies), Adipose Cells
  • This layer blends with Dermal Skin Layer and the Deep Fascia and provides a medium for lymph, neural & Vascular tissue courses through the body.
  1. Excessive Stress- Postural Stress – May result in overload or strain of tissue resulting in overproduction of substances like Collagen. This can be from inappropriate use involved in work, sport or from direct blow, strain or tear of tissue.
  2. Diss-use – Lack of movement leads to loss of stimulus for the fibroblasts to produce required fiber & ground substance therefore failing to maintain ideal levels of hydration

Reduced retention of water molecules is believed to allow collagen fibers to approximate toward each other which causes them to bind together via collagen crosslinks.

Limiting tissues ability to function optimally. Not allowing tissue to reach optimal length and structure: ie, neural and vascular tissue impingements or restrictions

Back to: HOME STUDY: 12 CE INTRODUCTION TO MYOFASCIAL DECOMPRESSION CUPPING > MODULE 1