Myofascial Decompression Cupping

5.1 RELEASING BONY PROMINENCES

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FASCIAL ADHESIONS

  • Like tiny but powerful straight jackets, adhesions can join structures from different bodily systems with strong glue-like bonds that can last a lifetime. As the body’s tissues heal and adhesions are formed, the tissues begin to shrink and pull, which results in restricted movement of the area. This ‘pull’ often creates mechanical irritation, generating more adhesion formation.

 

  • Adhesions can form anywhere in the body and cause organs, soft tissues, bones, tendons, ligaments, muscles to attach that should never be attached and can result in pain, severe organ interference requiring immediate surgery, to irritation to restrictive motion.

 

ADHESIONS AND FASCIAL MERIDIANS

  • Fascia is often found in sheet-like planes. These sheets of fascia tend to separate groups of muscles from one another, and will often extend great distances through the body. For example, there are planes of fascia that extend from the fingertips of the right hand to the fingertips of the left hand, through the shoulder girdle.

 

  • These planes of tissue are also sometimes known as fascial meridians. They extend through long lines in the body and transmit movement and other sensory information along the meridian. When any part of the meridian is adhered, the effect of the limitation is felt throughout the entire meridian.

 

  • When adhesions form along these sheets of fascia, symptoms feel like they cover a broad area. It is hard to pinpoint exactly where the pain is located. This is very common in areas of the body where muscles run parallel to one another as in the forearms.

 

 

ADHESIONS IN DEEP MUSCLE FASCIA

Fascia that penetrates through the muscle, surrounding individual muscle fibers, causes a different kind of problem when it becomes compromised. Adhesions in the deep muscular fascia tends to limit the ability of the muscle to contract, making it function and feel weaker. If you have developed a weakness in your forearm muscles, for example,  it is likely due to bonded areas deep in the belly of the muscle that may also be paired with adhesions in the seams of fascia between the muscles.

 

ADHESIONS TYPICALLY GROW AND SPREAD

  • Once an adhesion forms, it becomes, in itself, another form of additional stress to your body. You adapt by forming more bonds between muscles and other tissues, becoming even more stressful to your body. The effect of these distortions spreads throughout your body. And because much of the fascia in your body is found in the long and extended fascial meridians, the effects of those adhesions can extend far and wide throughout your body.

 

RELEASING BONY PROMINANCE ADHESIONS

  • Lubricate the area well.
  • Assess ROM and Pain and Discomfort
  • Start with a small cup with light suction
  • Dynamic and Stationary with light suction
  • Caution to NOT use strong suction as detachments have been known to occur with improper suction strength
  • Begin with small slow circular movements over the prominence expanding the area to treat all around the area
  • As the soft tissue in the area softens, start making slow deliberate movements the length of the prominence adding in slow cross movements and adding circular movements back in  
  • Reassess ROM, Pain and Discomfort and continue the treatment for several minutes. Never over 20 Minutes to one area and less time for smaller areas.

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